"You always think you're right."

I've hear that complaint occasionally, and I've never really understood it.  Of course I think I'm right. It's my opinion.  Who has an opinion they know to be wrong?

My opinions are informed by what I believe to be correct, and I hold them - perhaps defending them with slightly too much zeal, hence the complaints - until I am convinced or proven wrong.

Like I have been by the Martin St. Louis-era New York Rangers.

Days before Blueshirts GM Glen Sather deemed excessive the contract demands of then Captain Ryan Callahan and shipped him off to Tampa Bay in a business-savvy exchange for St. Louis, I urged him against it.

"To hell with the business," I said then, convinced that a Rangers team without Callahan was a team without a future.  "Ryan Callahan has been and is the heart of the New York Rangers.  And right now, the New York Rangers are a contender.  They have a shot.  Without him – without the heart – they don’t," I wrote.

I was sure, then, that a Callahan-less Blueshirts squad would lack the necessary grit to be a long-term threat in this league.  That with him, the Rangers could contend whilst pairing his grit and leadership with their developing up and back offensive style, but that without him, they lacked the fortitude needed to compete in the bearded days of April, May and June.

I was wrong.