#6: Lynn Swann's Graceful Catch in Super Bowl X

Credit: Justin K. Aller/Getty Images Sport

Super Bowl X between the Dallas Cowboys and Pittsburgh Steelers featured 11 Hall of Famers, including Terry Bradshaw, Roger Staubach, "Mean" Joe Greene, and Franco Harris.  However, it was Steelers WR, and another Hall of Famer, Lynn Swann who solidified himself in NFL lore with his amazing concentration on one particular catch in Super Bowl X that contributed to him becoming the first WR to win Super Bowl MVP honors.

Two weeks prior to their Super Bowl matchup against the Cowboys, Swann found himself in a hospital bed recovering from a concussion he endured in the AFC Championship game against the Raiders.  Surprisingly, Swann was able to play in the Super Bowl and put together not only a great performance, but a memorable moment as well.

Down 10-7 to the Cowboys late in the first half, the Steelers were pinned at their own 10-yard line and facing a 3rd and 6.  As the ball was snapped, Bradshaw was under pressure from the Cowboys pass rush. As they closed in on him, Bradshaw released a heave down field toward a streaking Swann.

Both Swann and Dallas CB Mark Washington leaped into the air in an attempt at the ball. What happened next was nothing short of spectacular.

Washington and Swann both tipped the underthrown Bradshaw pass, but Swann stayed focused, juggling the tipped pass before hauling it in for a 53-yard gain as he tumbled to the turf. That catch helped start the Steelers comeback to win their second straight title in their 21-17 win over the Dallas Cowboys.

Swann's acrobatics earned him a spot on our list as we count down the top 10 memorable moments in Super Bowl history.

Want to witness history for yourself? Enter the Super Bowl Send Off sweepstakes with Armen and Levack for a chance to be at Super Bowl 50 in San Francisco thanks to our friends at Budlight.  The next opportunity to enter is Thursday, December 3rd at Philly's Bar and Grill from 3pm-7pm. If you're "Up For Whatever", maybe YOU could be at Super Bowl 50.