Near the banks of the northern reaches of the Hudson River lies an abandoned mining settlement that will live in American history forever.

Originally settled by miners looking for iron ore in the early 1800s, no one knew the importance it would later play in the legacy of the American presidency. Visitors are now encouraged to visit the beautiful piece land.

John Lazzaro via YouTube
John Lazzaro via YouTube
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Tawahus Ghost Town in New York

The small village of Tahawus, NY dates back to 1826, when iron in the nearby banks of the Hudson River attracted industrious settlers. Unfortunately, lack of train service (as well as natural disasters and the passing of the town's founder), led to its abandonment 40 years later. It would soon be revived, however, and host one of the most famous moments in the American presidency.

John Lazzaro via YouTube
John Lazzaro via YouTube
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Presidential History at Tawahus Club in New York

The mid-1870s saw the establishment of  the Preston Ponds Club, later renamed the Tahawus Club, which welcomed such esteemed guests as Vice President Theodore Roosevelt. In fact, the Tahawus Club was effectively the last place Roosevelt was vice president, as he received news that the current president, William McKinley, had been shot. From the Open Space Institute (OSI):

In September 1901, Vice President Theodore Roosevelt was visiting the Tahawus hunting and fishing club when he received a piece of stunning news: President McKinley, struck by an assassin’s bullet, was dying in Buffalo. It was from Tahawus that Roosevelt embarked on his famous “Midnight Ride to the Presidency,” setting out in a buckboard wagon to North Creek Train Station

Tawahus once again became a mining town in the 1940s before being abandoned once again in the late 1980s. The OSI acquired the land in 1994, and is currently welcoming visitors to explore the historic site.

While many of the original buildings have been torn down, one cottage has been restored, and visitors can still see the blast furnace from the 1856. Camping, canoeing, and kayaking is also welcomed, as well as hikes through the incredible Northern Forest or to the peak of Mt. Marcy. Check out more fascinating abandoned sites below.

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