This is not an urban legend. The stories of insane patients and unmarked graves are fact and the crumbled buildings that remain are a reminder of a once revolutionary psychiatric center. A hospital notorious for treating certain patients by drilling a hole in their head to treat their mental illness.

Scroll through the pictures below and safely tour a graveyard filled with former patients from the 'Lobotomy Hospital', Pilgrim State Hospital, in Brentwood, NY.

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WARNING: Under no circumstances should you enter this property. By doing so you risk bodily harm and/or prosecution for trespassing on private property.

Building 23 at the Pilgrim State Hospital was the site of thousands of the crude, 45 minute, brain surgeries known as a lobotomy. These operations started at the hospital in the 1940's and continued into the 70's. Often times these procedures would leave the individual lifeless.

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A lobotomy was the leading treatment for mental illness until 1980's when drugs became available. Once pharmaceuticals reached the public not only did the procedure go away, so did the need for such facilities. But what is left behind?

There is a graveyard on the property and many buried here are those that once endured a lobotomy. Many of their graves are simply marked with a number and no name.

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Let's scroll through these pictures of the Pilgrim State Hospital in Brentwood, New York. Some of the pictures will show what the facility was like when they conducted lobotomies and others show the ruins of what was left behind.

Abandoned Pilgrim State Psychiatric Hospital

Also known as the 'Lobotomy Hospital' in Brentwood, NY

Abandoned Nevele Resort, Ellenville, New York

WARNING: Under no circumstances should you enter this property. By doing so you risk bodily harm and/or prosecution for trespassing on private property.

Abandoned Power House, Amsterdam New York

In 2017, the old Mohasco Power House in Amsterdam, NY was supposed to become an historical stop along the North Chuctanunda walking trail.

According to the Mohawk Valley Compass, the City of Amsterdam was awarded nearly $9,000 in grant money from the Preservation League of New York State. The hope was to determine whether the structure can be made safe for visitors. 5 years later, this is what it looks like.

WARNING: Under no circumstances should you enter this property. By doing so you risk bodily harm and/or prosecution for trespassing on private property.