The NCAA is one of the most powerful organizations in the world, protecting the virtue of the student athlete by not allowing them to be corrupted by such things as money, only filling them with sportsmanship and education while making billions from the work of these modern day indentured servants. Today, the NCAA cracked down on Johnny Manziel by suspending him for one half of Texas A&M's season opening game against Rice.

Manziel, last year's Heisman Trophy winner, will miss thirty minutes of action against Rice on Saturday in a deal between the NCAA and Texas A&M, despite the fact that the NCAA has acknowledged that Manziel didn't accept any money for autographs.

This suspension came after a six hour interview with Manziel by the NCAA on Sunday, filled with questions about his family, memorabilia dealers, and anything else that would put a dollar into his pocket instead of the NCAA's.

By the way, you would think that the NCAA would come down harder on Manziel if they had determined any wrongdoing, but the suspension isn't surprising given the large amount of Johnny Football gear they can profit from, the increased demand for tickets, and other financial benefits having him on the field possesses. Of course, none of those financial benefits will trickle down to him during his time as an indentured servant, er, I mean student athlete.